Television Personalities discography

And Don't The Kids Just Love It

sfire002cd
released January 2002

1. This Angry Silence
2. The Glittering Prizes
3. World Of Pauline Lewis
4. A Family Affair
5. Silly Girl
6. Diary Of A Young Man
7. Geoffrey Ingram
8. I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives
9. Jackanory Stories
10. Parties In Chelsea
11. La Grande Illusion
12. A Picture Of Dorian Gray
13. The Crying Room
14. Look Back In Anger

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AU$ 15.00


Reissue of the classic 1980 debut, And Don't The Kids Just Love It, from indie and punk cult heroes, The Television Personalities. For some, they have remained the quintessential Punk band, whilst for others they have become the foremost exponents of post-sixties pop psychedelia and an indelible influence on many of the early Creation label and C-86 bands as well as the likes of Kurt Cobain, Evan Dando and many, many others. The cover of And Don't The Kids Just Love It - a collage bringing together supermodel Twiggy and The Avengers' John Steed- is a strong indication of where the Television Personalities are coming from: their debut is a loving ode to sixties-era pop and pop culture, referencing movies (Look Back in Anger), Kinks-like class commentary (Geoffrey Ingram) and psychedelic casualties (I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives). It's a perfect introduction to the bands jangling psychedelic pop punk and Dan Treacy's whispy tales of love and life.

"Probably the definitive Television Personalities Artefact." - Alan McGee.

The first full album by Television Personalities, recorded after a four-year series of often brilliant D.I.Y. singles recorded under a variety of names, including the O-Level and the Teenage Filmstars, is probably the purest expression of Daniel Treacy's sweet-and-sour worldview. The songs, performed by Treacy, Ed Ball, and Mark Sheppard, predict both the C-86 aesthetic of simple songs played with a minimum of elaboration but a maximum of enthusiasm and earnestness and the later lo-fi aesthetic. The echoey, hissy production makes the songs sound as if the band were playing at the bottom of an empty swimming pool, recorded by a single microphone located two houses away, yet somehow that adds to the homemade charm of the record. Treacy's vocals are tremulous and shy, and his lyrics run from the playful 'Jackanory Stories' to several rather dark songs that foreshadow the depressive cast of many of his later albums. 'Diary of a Young Man', which consists of several spoken diary entries over a haunting, moody twang-guitar melody, is downright scary in its aura of helplessness and inertia. The mood is lightened a bit by some of the peppier songs, like the smashing 'World of Pauline Lewis' and the 'David Watts' rewrite 'Geoffrey Ingram', and the re-recorded version of the earlier single 'I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives', complete with deliberately intrusive prerecorded bird sounds, is one of the most charming things Television Personalities ever did. This album must have sounded hopelessly amateurish and cheaply ramshackle at the time of its 1981 release, but in retrospect, it's clearly a remarkably influential album that holds up extremely well. - Stewart Mason, AMG



They Could Have Been Bigger Than the Beatles

sfire014cd
released January 2002

1. Three Wishes
2. David Hockney's Diary
3. In a Perfumed Garden
4. Flowers for Abigail
5. King and Country
6. The Boy in the Paisley Shirt
7. Games for Boys
8. Painter Man
9. Psychedelic Holiday
10. 14th Floor
11. Sooty's Disco Party
12. Makin' Time
13. When Emily Cries
14. The Glittering Prizes
15. Anxiety Block
16. Mysterious Ways

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AU$ 15.00


Television Personalities split up in 1982, after five years as D.I.Y. pioneers. It turned out to be a temporary development (although Ed Ball, Dan Treacy's artistic foil, never did return, busying himself by turning his side project, the Times, into a full-time sorry proposition), but the split was marked by the mysterious compilation They Could Have Been Bigger Than the Beatles. An unannotated collection of re-recorded versions of tracks from their first two albums, early singles, and unreleased outtakes, this should by all rights be a complete mess. Funnily enough, it works a treat, being more consistently entertaining than 1982's Mummy Your Not Watching Me, though not as conceptually perfect as 1981's excellent And Don't The Kids Just Love It. Highlights include a much-improved new version of 'David Hockney's Diaries' and the gentle freakbeat of 'The Boy in the Paisley Shirt' and 'Psychedelic Holiday'. Treacy also pays tribute to the then-forgotten Creation, with enthusiastically sloppy versions of 'Painter Man' and 'Makin' Time'. - Stewart Mason, AMG

Britain's Television Personalities enjoyed one of the new wave era's longest, most erratic and most far-reaching careers. Over the course of a musical evolution which led them from wide-eyed, shambling pop to the outer reaches of psychedelia and back, the group directly influenced virtually every major pop uprising of the period, with artists as diverse as feedback virtuosos the Jesus & Mary Chain, twee-pop titans the Pastels and lo-fi kingpins Pavement readily acknowledging the TVPs' inspiration.

The Television Personalities were the brainchild of singer/songwriter Dan Treacy, who grew so inspired by the nascent punk movement that he recorded a 1977 single, '14th Floor', with his friends in the group O Level. The BBC's John Peel became a vocal supporter of the group soon dubbed the Television Personalities and a year later they issued an EP, 'Where's Bill Grundy Now?', which featured their lone hit, 'Part-Time Punks'.

Always a loose-knit group, the first relatively stable TVP line-up consisted of Treacy, organist vocalist Ed Ball and guitarist Joe Foster, who recorded the band's 1980 debut And Don't The Kids Just Love It, a step into psychedelic pop typified by songs like 'I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives'. Treacy and Ball soon founded their own label, Whaam! (later renamed Dreamworld after threats from George Michael's attorneys), to issue 1981's Mummy Your Not Watching Me, which made the Personalities one of the figureheads of a London psychedelia revival. - AMG



Yes Darling, But Is It Art?

sfire024cd
released January 2003

1. 14th Floor
2. Oxford St W1
3. Part Time Punks
4. Where's Bill Grundy Now
5. Happy Families
6. Posing At The Roundhouse
7. Smashing Time
8. King And Country
9. I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives (Original)
10. Arthur The Gardener
11. The Prettiest Girl In The World
12. That's What Love Is
13. Three Wishes
14. And Don't The Kids Just Love It
15. A Sense Of Belonging
16. How I Learned To Love The...Bomb
17. A Girl Called Charity
18. She's Only The Grocers Daughter
19. Now You're Just Being Ridiculous
20. God Snaps His Fingers
21. The Dream Inspires
22. Favourite Films
23. Me And My Desire
24. Miracles Take Longer

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AU$ 15.00


A packed 24-track set, 1995's Yes Darling, But Is It Art? performs an invaluable service by collecting the Television Personalities' early singles and b-sides, but it's an incomplete and inconclusive history that presents a somewhat skewed history of the band. The real meat of the album is in the first ten tracks, all of which pre-date the group's first album, 1981's And Don't The Kids Just Love It. Several of these songs were released under other names like the O-Level's classic 'Where's Bill Grundy Now?' and 'Part Time Punks'. These are the start of the DIY pop underground that led to the Pastels, the Marine Girls, the C86 movement, Sarah Records and other institutions of British indie pop, and they sound as fresh now as they did when they were recorded.

The album then makes an odd stylistic leap, all but ignoring the group's 1982-1989 period and picking the story back up with the singles and B-sides from the Privilege and Closer To God era. These are rather less interesting tracks (though 'A Girl Called Charity' and 'Now You're Just Being Ridiculous' are stellar), heavy on the stylistic experiments and light on the sort of pop melodies that make Treacy's best tracks so memorable. And there are some inexcusable oversights as well; for example, the brilliant 1992 b-side 'An Exhibition by John Miro', from the 'We Will Be Your Gurus' single, is unfortunately absent here. Overall, this is more for confirmed fans than newbies, though the early single sides are essential. - Stewart Mason, AMG

"The early Television Personalities songs were charming, stumbling, foppishly ironic gems." - Q



Privilege

sfire026cd
released January 2002

1. Paradise Is For The Blessed
2. A Good And Faithful Servant
3. Conscience Tells Me No
4. My Hedonistic Tendencies
5. All My Dreams Are Dead
6. Salvador Dali's Garden Party
7. The Man Who Paints The Rainbows
8. What If It's Raining?
9. Sad Mona Lisa
10. The Engine Driver Song
11. Sometimes I Think You Know Me Better Than I Know Myself
12. Privilege
13. Room At The Top Of The Stairs
14. This Time There's No Happy Ending
15. Part One: Fulfilling The Contractual Obligations

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AU$ 15.00


Privilege itself is rather special. Nowhere else will you hear songs as bittersweet, caustic and charming as 'A Good & Faithful Servant' and 'What If It's Raining'. They're all worth hearing time and time again." - Everett True, Melody Maker

Given that the crisp Privilege is the Television Personalities' first studio LP in four years, Dan Treacy has every right to be in a less-than-sunny mood songs like 'All My Dreams Are Dead', 'This Time There's No Happy Ending' and 'Sad Mona Lisa' are to be expected when a fertile songwriting talent finds himself without means of recording and releasing new material. The end result is one of the group's most personal and dark records, although the wonderful 'Salvador Dali's Art Party' which runs down all of the luminaries on the guest list is a return to the psychedelic name-dropping of the group's formative years. - Jason Ankeny, AMG

Britain's Television Personalities enjoyed one of the new wave era's longest, most erratic and most far-reaching careers. Over the course of a musical evolution which led them from wide-eyed, shambling pop to the outer reaches of psychedelia and back, the group directly influenced virtually every major pop uprising of the period, with artists as diverse as feedback virtuosos the Jesus & Mary Chain, twee-pop titans the Pastels and lo-fi kingpins Pavement readily acknowledging the TVPs' inspiration.

The Television Personalities were the brainchild of singer/songwriter Dan Treacy, who grew so inspired by the nascent punk movement that he recorded a 1977 single, '14th Floor', with his friends in the group O Level. The BBC's John Peel became a vocal supporter of the group soon dubbed the Television Personalities and a year later they issued an EP, 'Where's Bill Grundy Now?', which featured their lone hit, 'Part-Time Punks'.

Always a loose-knit group, the first relatively stable TVP line-up consisted of Treacy, organist vocalist Ed Ball and guitarist Joe Foster, who recorded the band's 1980 debut And Don't The Kids Just Love It, a step into psychedelic pop typified by songs like 'I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives'. Treacy and Ball soon founded their own label, Whaam! (later renamed Dreamworld after threats from George Michael's attorneys), to issue 1981's Mummy Your Not Watching Me, which made the Personalities one of the figureheads of a London psychedelia revival. - AMG



The Painted Word

sfire029cd
released January 2002

1. Stop And Smell the Roses
2. The Painted Word
3. A Life Of Her Own
4. Bright Sunny Smiles
5. Mentioned In Dispatches
6. A Sense Of Belonging
7. Say You Won't Cry
8. Someone To Share My Life With
9. You'll Have To Scream Louder
10. Happy All The Time
11. The Girl Who Had Everything
12. Paradise Estate
13. Back To Vietnam

REDUCED PRICE!

AU$ 15.00


A more cleanly produced TVPs record than most of their previous efforts, The Painted Word is also a more serious album, less whimsical but no less charming; favoring a subtle, droning pop sound, tracks like the politically charged 'Back to Vietnam' and the lovely 'Someone To Share My Life With' are heartfelt and resonant, foreshadowing the more dramatic twists taken by Dan Treacy's songwriting following the band's long late-1980s layoff. - Jason Ankeny, AMG

"The Painted Word, alongside Big Star's Sister Lovers and any one of Nick Drake's LPs, is one of the best emotionally introspective LPs I've ever heard. Dan Treacy's songs tear me apart. This is their finest moment. Both the humour and tragedy of the songs are beautiful. It deserves re-release. Well done Fire." - Alan McGee, Creation Records 1990



Half A Cow
Half A Cow Records
PO Box 1100 STRAWBERRY HILLS NSW 2012 Australia
Email: haclabel@mpx.com.au
Phone: +61-2-9716 6926
ABN 93 300 971 980