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Privilege
by Television Personalities

PRICE AU$ 15.00

(Fire Records, England )
released

Privilege itself is rather special. Nowhere else will you hear songs as bittersweet, caustic and charming as 'A Good & Faithful Servant' and 'What If It's Raining'. They're all worth hearing time and time again." - Everett True, Melody Maker

Given that the crisp Privilege is the Television Personalities' first studio LP in four years, Dan Treacy has every right to be in a less-than-sunny mood songs like 'All My Dreams Are Dead', 'This Time There's No Happy Ending' and 'Sad Mona Lisa' are to be expected when a fertile songwriting talent finds himself without means of recording and releasing new material. The end result is one of the group's most personal and dark records, although the wonderful 'Salvador Dali's Art Party' which runs down all of the luminaries on the guest list is a return to the psychedelic name-dropping of the group's formative years. - Jason Ankeny, AMG

Britain's Television Personalities enjoyed one of the new wave era's longest, most erratic and most far-reaching careers. Over the course of a musical evolution which led them from wide-eyed, shambling pop to the outer reaches of psychedelia and back, the group directly influenced virtually every major pop uprising of the period, with artists as diverse as feedback virtuosos the Jesus & Mary Chain, twee-pop titans the Pastels and lo-fi kingpins Pavement readily acknowledging the TVPs' inspiration.

The Television Personalities were the brainchild of singer/songwriter Dan Treacy, who grew so inspired by the nascent punk movement that he recorded a 1977 single, '14th Floor', with his friends in the group O Level. The BBC's John Peel became a vocal supporter of the group soon dubbed the Television Personalities and a year later they issued an EP, 'Where's Bill Grundy Now?', which featured their lone hit, 'Part-Time Punks'.

Always a loose-knit group, the first relatively stable TVP line-up consisted of Treacy, organist vocalist Ed Ball and guitarist Joe Foster, who recorded the band's 1980 debut And Don't The Kids Just Love It, a step into psychedelic pop typified by songs like 'I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives'. Treacy and Ball soon founded their own label, Whaam! (later renamed Dreamworld after threats from George Michael's attorneys), to issue 1981's Mummy Your Not Watching Me, which made the Personalities one of the figureheads of a London psychedelia revival. - AMG


1. Paradise Is For The Blessed
2. A Good And Faithful Servant
3. Conscience Tells Me No
4. My Hedonistic Tendencies
5. All My Dreams Are Dead
6. Salvador Dali's Garden Party
7. The Man Who Paints The Rainbows
8. What If It's Raining?
9. Sad Mona Lisa
10. The Engine Driver Song
11. Sometimes I Think You Know Me Better Than I Know Myself
12. Privilege
13. Room At The Top Of The Stairs
14. This Time There's No Happy Ending
15. Part One: Fulfilling The Contractual Obligations



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Half A Cow
Half A Cow Records
PO Box 1100 STRAWBERRY HILLS NSW 2012 Australia
Email: haclabel@mpx.com.au
Phone: +61-2-9705 7014
ABN 93 300 971 980